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Omaha Indian Music

Click on the links below to hear traditional Native American music in the Windows Media Player format.  Click on the link above for many more songs like these.

Omaha Contest Song

Gourd Song

Men's Traditional Dance Contest Song


The Power of Kiowa Song

Click on the links below to hear traditional Native American music in the Windows Media Player format.  Click on the link above for many more songs like these.

Red Wolf Song

Hunting Horse's Song

War Dance Song

Other Audio Files

Walela--Amazing Grace sung in Cherokee

"The Woman Who Turned Herself to Stone" read by Mary Louise Defender Wilson.  Click here for her website.

About this story:

"The Woman Who Turned Herself to Stone" is about a Dakotah woman's love of nature. It is also about an important feature in the Standing Rock Reservation/Dakotah landscape. Dakotah stories, like many Native American stories, contain "why" tales that explain the origin of the people, their religious beliefs, and certain natural things in the landscape like boulders or lakes. Mary Louise's story, "The Woman Who Turned Herself to Stone," is an example of a story that is specific to a landscape. It is also an example of a story that teaches respect for nature and environmentalism.

One of the stones in Mary Louise's story can be found near the area of Pyramid Hill where, according to Dakotah belief, their people began. The region is located in southeastern North Dakota near Fort Ransom. Mary Louise often visits this stone to make offerings.

Mary Louise says, according to tradition, there were four women who turned themselves to stone, two east of the Missouri River and two west of the Missouri River. Only three have been seen.
 

Two Stone Women with Mary Louise
Photo Courtesy of Mary Louise Defender Wilson

The Dark Stone Woman (left) sits on a small knoll north of Fort Ransom, east of the Missouri River. The Light Stone Woman, found west of the Missouri River near Half Timber Butte, lives with Mary Louise in Sheilds, ND. Many Dakotah believe that there are opposites of everything in the natural world, for example, the stone in the story is light and her counterpart is dark

 

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Last modified: October 10, 2004